vobios.tumblelog

i hate the internet, but these are the pieces i like
Sep 19 '14
In the 1970s, every McDonald’s coffee came with a special stirring spoon. It was a glorious, elegant utensil — long, thin handle, tiny scooper on the end, each pridefully topped with the golden arches. It was a spoon specially designed to stir steaming brews, a spoon with no bad intentions. It was also a spoon that lived in a dangerous era for spoons. Cocaine use was rampant and crafty dealers were constantly on the prowl for inconspicuous tools with which to measure and ingest the white powder. In the thralls of an anti-drug initiative, the innocent spoon soon found itself at the center of controversy, prompting McDonald’s to redesign it. (via The McDonald’s Cocaine Spoon Fiasco)

In the 1970s, every McDonald’s coffee came with a special stirring spoon. It was a glorious, elegant utensil — long, thin handle, tiny scooper on the end, each pridefully topped with the golden arches. It was a spoon specially designed to stir steaming brews, a spoon with no bad intentions. It was also a spoon that lived in a dangerous era for spoons. Cocaine use was rampant and crafty dealers were constantly on the prowl for inconspicuous tools with which to measure and ingest the white powder. In the thralls of an anti-drug initiative, the innocent spoon soon found itself at the center of controversy, prompting McDonald’s to redesign it. (via The McDonald’s Cocaine Spoon Fiasco)

Tags: spoon mcdonalds history drug

Sep 2 '14
Kids in DC and Maryland are trudging back to school today, but for their peers in Virginia, summer vacation is still going. The Commonwealth’s students don’t start class until next week, thanks to the state’s powerful amusement-park lobby. Virginia prohibits city and county school districts from starting class before Labor Day, thanks to a 1986 law designed to give an extra week’s worth of busy crowds to the state’s tourism industry, especially theme parks like Kings Dominion and Busch Gardens. Despite many attempts by some legislators to allow local school systems to set their own calendars, the law survives, largely thanks to regular donations from amusement park operators, giving the statute its nickname of the “Kings Dominion Law.”

Tags: virginia law

Aug 19 '14

Tags: nyc housing

Aug 18 '14

Many people have been asking why the puppies are sleeping in pans. When we would feed the puppies their wet food from a pan, they would all quickly eat the food and then compete to sleep in the bottom of the pan. For some reason, they really liked the pans (we suspect the glass was cool for them)! Because of this, we decided to just give each their own pan so they wouldn’t have to fight. They seemed to really like the idea!

(Source: youtube.com)

Tags: dog college

Jul 1 '14

Mar 28 '14
75% of human migration from 2005-2010

75% of human migration from 2005-2010

Tags: world people

Mar 24 '14

Do dogs react to magic?

(Source: youtube.com)

Tags: dog

Mar 20 '14

Tags: nyc hotel money

Mar 17 '14

"Nothingness is even funnier without commercials!"

(Source: vimeo.com)

Tags: tv nyc history

Dec 31 '13

It’s time to get noticed!

(Source: youtube.com)

Tags: economy ad

Dec 31 '13
As of Dec. 29, the number of homicides recorded for New York City this year stood at 332. It’s a drop of 20% below the homicide rate of 2012 (419 murders) and the first time in over half a century that the city saw less than one murder a day on average.

As of Dec. 29, the number of homicides recorded for New York City this year stood at 332. It’s a drop of 20% below the homicide rate of 2012 (419 murders) and the first time in over half a century that the city saw less than one murder a day on average.

Tags: history nyc

Nov 12 '13

I see too much sorrow and ugliness to love football like I used to.

I watch Indianapolis quarterback Andrew Luck take a brutal lick now and I think of former Packers quarterback Brett Favre, who told a Washington radio show the other day he can’t remember most of his daughter’s soccer games. “That’s a little bit scary to me,” Favre said. “… That put a little fear in me.” He’s 44 years old.

I watch New England tight end Rob Gronkowski get up from wreck after wreck, and I think of former Colts tight end Ben Utecht, who said the other day he couldn’t remember being at a friend’s wedding until the friend showed him the photo album. See, you were a groomsmen. And you sang, remember? He’s 32 years old.

I watch Minnesota running back Adrian Peterson fling himself into crashing whirlpools of men and I think of former Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett, who said he sometimes finds himself driving on a highway and can’t remember where he’s going. “I’m just hoping and praying I can find a way to cut it off at the pass,” Dorsett said recently. He’s 59 years old.

I see too much sorrow and ugliness now to love football like I used to.

Tags: football health

Sep 23 '13

Tags: school history

Sep 8 '13
The question of jellyfish death is vexing. If jellyfish fall on hard times, they can simply “de-grow.” That is, they reduce in size, but their bodies remain in proportion. That’s a very different outcome from what is seen in starving fish, or people. And when food becomes available again, jellyfish simply recommence growing. Some individual jellyfish live for a decade. But the polyp stage survives pretty much indefinitely by cloning. One polyp colony started in 1935 and studied ever since is still alive and well in a laboratory in Virginia. One kind of jellyfish, which might be termed the zombie jelly, is quite literally immortal. When Turritopsis dohrnii “dies” it begins to disintegrate, which is pretty much what you expect from a corpse. But then something strange happens. A number of cells escape the rotting body. These cells somehow find each other, and reaggregate to form a polyp. All of this happens within five days of the jellyfish’s “death,” and weirdly, it’s the norm for the species.

Sep 5 '13
In the competitive world of academia, colleges are always looking for ways to burnish their image. Drexel University is trying to do it one orange brick at a time. Still smarting from the days when it was tagged the “ugliest campus” in America in a college-ranking survey, the West Philadelphia institution has begun a massive effort to colorize its oft-derided orange-brick buildings, transforming them from garish tangerine to tasteful collegiate red. It is accomplishing this by equipping workers with miniature paint rollers and dispatching them to coat each offending orange brick, one by one.

In the competitive world of academia, colleges are always looking for ways to burnish their image. Drexel University is trying to do it one orange brick at a time. Still smarting from the days when it was tagged the “ugliest campus” in America in a college-ranking survey, the West Philadelphia institution has begun a massive effort to colorize its oft-derided orange-brick buildings, transforming them from garish tangerine to tasteful collegiate red. It is accomplishing this by equipping workers with miniature paint rollers and dispatching them to coat each offending orange brick, one by one.

Tags: college pennsylvania